who gives a crap zero waste toilet paper

When was the last time you got excited about toilet paper? I’m willing to guess you’ve NEVER been excited about toilet paper, and you’re not alone. If you were like me, you put off restocking your rolls until you were dangerously low and had to rush out for a late night Target run. Far from a pleasant experience, as much fun as those late night Target runs can be.

And yes, toilet paper in itself is not a glamorous product. For me, I tried to buy the cheapest, largest package that least resembled tissue paper and it was always packaged in plastic. Even the sustainable brands were packaged in plastic, so why bother? I did find some small paper-wrapped rolls at health food stores, but they were always expensive, small and didn’t feel the nicest on my lady bits.

Enter, Who Gives A Crap.

First Impression

I’m super into the idea of bulk shopping made simple, so I love that the giant box of Who Gives A Crap came straight to my door. No more late night Target runs. I’m also 8 months pregnant and anything that can make my life a little easier, and reduce heavy lifting, is much appreciated. I couldn’t help but smile at their ‘cheeky’ branding on the outside of the box.

who gives a crap zero waste toilet paper

The Packaging

48 rolls individually wrapped in colorful paper in a large cardboard box. The paper they use to wrap the rolls is super cute and offers some good insight on what Who Gives A Crap is about. You might wonder why they can’t just put the toilet paper naked in the box — wrapping them in paper is the only way they can keep the toilet paper moisture-free and hygienic. I get it, and will be reusing the paper as packing material for our customer orders. The box is sealed shut with a single piece of plastic tape (a small minus). I have heard rumblings that they’re exploring alternative options. There are no additional paper or plastic packaging materials inside the box. Just 48 snuggled rolls.

who gives a crap zero waste toilet paper

The Toilet Paper

Who Gives A Crap toilet paper is made from 100% recycled paper with no dyes, inks or scents. I love that they primarily source their paper from local schools, including textbooks, workbooks and office paper. Great example of using ‘reuse’ to solve a waste issue. I compared the toilet paper to the standard rolls we last bought and they seemed softer, sturdier and more tightly packed (aka more toilet paper per roll). Look at this side view comparing the paper — it seems like the standard roll (in the back)  has a lot more wasted air space versus the Who Gives A Crap roll (in the front). So you’re definitely get more for your money with Who Gives A Crap, and I would expect that their rolls last much longer.

who gives a crap zero waste toilet paper

who gives a crap zero waste toilet paper

Feel Goods

Beyond the toilet paper feeling good on your tush, it also makes your heart feel good. Who Gives A Crap donates a whopping 50% of their profits to help build toilets for communities in need. Sadly, 289,000 children under the age of five die every year from diarrheal diseases caused by poor water quality and sanitation issues. Toilets have been found to be a great solution as they help improve basic sanitation and hygiene, and help protect the water supply. Also, as mentioned above, Who Gives A Crap only uses environmentally friendly materials in their rolls. Most toilet paper companies use virgin trees, and consume loads of energy and water to process the trees into toilet paper.

who gives a crap zero waste toilet paper

Cost

You can buy a box of Who Gives A Crap for $30 (for 24 rolls) or $48 (for 48 rolls). I definitely will continue buying the $48 roll box since I like to buy in bulk and it’s a great value, at 25 cents per 100 sheets. They also offer a box of premium toilet paper made from ‘forest-friendly bamboo’ at $52 for 48 rolls.

Also, FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25! Score.

Who Gives A Crap was generous enough to offer our readers a discount — click here for $10 off your first order.

 

Comments

Lynn Delage

Lynn Delage said:

This sounds really great and environmentally friendly but I can’t afford $48 for 48 rolls. I am on a limited income and must buy as cheap as possible. That’s the problem with being eco correct, it costs money I can’t afford.

Bonnie

Bonnie said:

Discount code isn’t working. Any suggestions? I’m trying to buy the 48 rolls for $48.

Dana M Dolezsar

Dana M Dolezsar said:

The link to discount rolls is not working

Dana M Dolezsar

Dana M Dolezsar said:

The link to discount rolls is not working

Rebecca Minnick

Rebecca Minnick said:

I have given this a lot of thought but I have concerns about a company that makes their product in China claiming to be eco-friendly. So they use eco-friendly materials but then ship the product across the globe? Doesn’t that outweigh the eco-friendliness of it? I have been buying TP from the grocery that says “from responsibly harvested forests” or something because my grocery only carries 7th gen and that stuff is like sandpaper. It is wrapped in plastic, which is “recyclable” (if there is a market for that.) I’d love an eco-comparison of the cost/benefit of the shipping vs eco-friendly materials.

Margot

Margot said:

I really wanted to try this TP however…they don’t ship to AK or HI,…how is this an invitation to limit wastefulness?

Gwyn

Gwyn said:

Isn’t it annoying when people have blogs and don’t answer or reply to comments? Rebecca made an interesting comment about the product being made in China. I might email the company directly to get their thoughts on that, as I love the concept behind the company in terms of their profit donations.

Sofy

Sofy said:

Hello friends,
same concern around here about sustainability and so on. I used wildminimalist shop before and was really happy. I was also on the search of a more sustainable TP and looked up Who gives a crap. We tried and were not impressed at all. We live in California but come from Europe where our derrières have been use to sturdy TP. Moving to another continent we discovered a lot of differences and it’s part of the fun. The results for us is that, the layers are thiner and so even if there’s more of them they break easely. I wish it wasn’t the case because I really liked the idea of Who gives a crap. Unfortunately, I didn’t have to chase stuck scraps of TP before this one. So I won’t be ordering again. Just glad I didn’t sign up for a plan.

Leave a comment

Comments

Lynn Delage

Lynn Delage said:

This sounds really great and environmentally friendly but I can’t afford $48 for 48 rolls. I am on a limited income and must buy as cheap as possible. That’s the problem with being eco correct, it costs money I can’t afford.

Bonnie

Bonnie said:

Discount code isn’t working. Any suggestions? I’m trying to buy the 48 rolls for $48.

Dana M Dolezsar

Dana M Dolezsar said:

The link to discount rolls is not working

Dana M Dolezsar

Dana M Dolezsar said:

The link to discount rolls is not working

Rebecca Minnick

Rebecca Minnick said:

I have given this a lot of thought but I have concerns about a company that makes their product in China claiming to be eco-friendly. So they use eco-friendly materials but then ship the product across the globe? Doesn’t that outweigh the eco-friendliness of it? I have been buying TP from the grocery that says “from responsibly harvested forests” or something because my grocery only carries 7th gen and that stuff is like sandpaper. It is wrapped in plastic, which is “recyclable” (if there is a market for that.) I’d love an eco-comparison of the cost/benefit of the shipping vs eco-friendly materials.

Margot

Margot said:

I really wanted to try this TP however…they don’t ship to AK or HI,…how is this an invitation to limit wastefulness?

Gwyn

Gwyn said:

Isn’t it annoying when people have blogs and don’t answer or reply to comments? Rebecca made an interesting comment about the product being made in China. I might email the company directly to get their thoughts on that, as I love the concept behind the company in terms of their profit donations.

Sofy

Sofy said:

Hello friends,
same concern around here about sustainability and so on. I used wildminimalist shop before and was really happy. I was also on the search of a more sustainable TP and looked up Who gives a crap. We tried and were not impressed at all. We live in California but come from Europe where our derrières have been use to sturdy TP. Moving to another continent we discovered a lot of differences and it’s part of the fun. The results for us is that, the layers are thiner and so even if there’s more of them they break easely. I wish it wasn’t the case because I really liked the idea of Who gives a crap. Unfortunately, I didn’t have to chase stuck scraps of TP before this one. So I won’t be ordering again. Just glad I didn’t sign up for a plan.

Leave a comment